Rolling Seas

A friend of mine recently related his sailing adventures. Part of his trip involved sailing along the coast of New Jersey into New York Harbor. Off the coast of Atlantic City, he ran into some easterly swells that were crossed by a westerly chop. A confused sea it was and here’s his photo:

Rough seas off the coast of Atlantic City.

This photo illustrates why I prefer to fly, as opposed to sail. Better to be above the weather than in it. Each adventure has its challenges. Be careful whatever you do.

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Published in: on September 25, 2012 at 7:27 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Cunard’s Queen Victoria

Cunard’s Queen Victoria made a stop in Aruba recently. She’s more of a traditional ship as far as her lines go. Less flash, probably more class. Take a look.

Cunard's Queen Victoria in Aruba.

I like the hull painted a darker color like that, along with the red for the below the waterline portion, gives a sense of gravitas to a ship. Either way, I’m sure it’s a magnificent floating palace for you to enjoy a vacation. Don’t forget to check where the lifeboats are!

Tugboat Tour, video

In conversations at book signings and other events, people ask me how I came to be a writer. It was a winding path, though plenty of interesting places. One of those locales was the Philadelphia waterfront, including the Delaware River and Bay as well as the Atlantic Ocean. Part of my business involved tugboats and barges. So, here’s a video tour of the tug High Roller, a boat that I worked with while in that environment.

That’s quite a piece of floating machinery, isn’t it? One of the main engines has just been rebuilt, to the tune of about $250,000. That gives you an idea of what things cost in this field. While underway, the boat burns close to a hundred gallons of diesel fuel an hour. Do the math at today’s prices and you come up with a steep number indeed. Nonetheless, the job has to be done and working with the High Roller was always a fun challenge. Hopefully, I’ll have a chance to interview the owner, a fellow who is a real character. Stay tuned.

Published in: on October 17, 2011 at 12:52 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Scuba Subway

In my past career, I built artificial reefs by sinking ships and concrete pipe among other materials. In the early 2000′s, New York City decided to dispose of some of their obsolete subway cars by deploying them in the ocean for the purpose of building reefs. They were distributed down the east coast, some as far as South Carolina, where the following footage was taken. Scuba dive on the subway line to Davey Jones’ locker.

Amazing footage! The sea turtle was particularly impressive as were the numbers of fish seen only ten months after deployment. Reef building is good for the environment. It creates new habitat that forms the basis for the entire marine ecosystem. This video is proof.

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