Indie Photo Lab, Philadelphia

Here’s a “thank you” and “job well done” to Indie Photo Lab in Philadelphia. As viewers of this blog will know, I’ve been meddling in film photography again. Of course, I need a professional lab to develop and scan my results. The crew at Indie Photo Lab did a great job, especially on some scans of 4X5 film I shot more than 15 years ago. Here’s a digital look at their storefront.

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They process b/w and color of various kinds. Check out their website for more details: http://www.indiephotolab.com Friendly staff at the counter, too, which makes a big difference. Enjoy the art.

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Philadelphia Fire Boat (circa 2000)

The previous post showed my old Nikon F3 HP. As mentioned, I put many rolls of film through that camera. Some shots were good, others not so much. I happened to be on the Delaware River during OpSail 200o and took this snap of the Philadelphia Fire Boat leading the parade of sailing ships.

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The above image is a scan from a negative. A little dusty here and there. Nonetheless, you get the idea of this rugged little craft and it’s capabilities. Will be putting a few more photos up soon. Stay tuned and thanks for watching!

Nikon F3

Way back when (the 1980’s anyway) the Nikon F3 was a top of the line 35mm camera. After saving my money for a long time, I bought a new one in 1986. It’s a little dusty, but here it is, complete with the MD4 motor drive:

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This camera has traveled everywhere I’ve gone, never once missing a shot. Here’s a look at the other side:

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And speaking of the MD4 motor drive, the ergonomics of it were perfect for my hands as seen in the next photo:

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The motor drive, with 8 AA batteries, made for a sturdy hand-hold and great base. I’m not sure how many rolls of film I ran through this camera, thousands at the very least. Having just found a local lab that will process b/w film, I’ve decided to take it out for a spin, just to see how things look. Of course, it’s all digital now, but the simplicity of this camera (in today’s terms) can’t be beat. Remember, it’s the quality of the light, much more than the quality of the camera, that makes for great photos. Try it, you’ll see.

On the blocks!

The previous post showed the barkentine Gazela in position in the graving dock. Today we take a look at her on the blocks. These photos are large on purpose. They’re excellent eye-candy for people who appreciate all things nautical. Let’s start with the long view:

Sailing vessel Gazela on the blocks at the former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Sailing vessel Gazela on the blocks at the former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Moving closer, here’s a dramatic view of the bow.

Bow of the Gazela in the graving dock at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Bow of the Gazela in the graving dock at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

And here’s a view of the stern:

Looking up at the stern of Gazela on the blocks at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Looking up at the stern of Gazela on the blocks at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

And finally here’s a view from above of both Gazela and the lightering barge.

Gazela and barge in graving dock at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Gazela and barge in graving dock at former Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Now the work begins, repairs and refits. Keeping any vessel afloat is lots of work. The reward is in the sail afterward. Stay posted for more updates. (For those interested, these photos were taken with a Nikon D810 and 17-35mm lens.)