Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia (2014)

As long as we’re on the subject of religious buildings, let’s take a look at the Church of the Vera Cruz in Segovia, Spain.

Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

The building was dedicated in 1208, more than 800 years ago. Inside, you’ll find an elevated chamber within the main structure.

Inside the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Inside the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

A staircase leads up to this inner sanctum.

Staircase inside the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Staircase inside the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

There’s an altar within that chamber that you see in the next photo:

Altar inside the inner chamber at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Altar inside the inner chamber at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

From up there you have a view down to the side chapels, such as this one:

View to one of the chapels in the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

View to one of the chapels in the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

You’ll also find this reliquary in a separate place:

Reliquary at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Reliquary at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

The exterior also bears a number of carved columns that are worth investigating.

Exterior carvings at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

Exterior carvings at the Church of the Vera Cruz, Segovia, Spain.

This is the third time I’ve visited this building. However, it was only the first time that I was able to go inside. Be sure to check the hours of operation prior to arrival.

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Church of the Vera Cruz (again)

This is the second time I’ve visited the Church of the Vera Cruz in Segovia, Spain, and I was frustrated to find it closed… again!

In fact, I missed the opening hours by mere minutes. This is a Templar church and therefore mandatory on the itinerary. Nonetheless, I checked out some of the exterior detail such as theses capitals:

My understanding is that the interior is quite basic. Still, it’s worth a visit considering it’s place in history. Seeing sights like this goes a long way to contextualizing historical references and it is well worth the time seeking out the smaller, out of the way places as they were on the route followed by people in days gone by. It is a method of seeing what they saw, doing what they did. Enjoy the journey.

Published in: on September 21, 2010 at 5:28 pm  Leave a Comment  
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