Landing 9R at KMIA

Another excellent flight aboard American Airlines. We were on time and arrived in comfort after a nice breakfast. Here’s a look at the landing at Miami International:

There are many professionals working behind the scenes, people we never get to see, making sure our flights are safe. Be a good passenger by cooperating with cabin staff and your fellow travelers. Courtesy is free. Use it liberally. (For those interested, this video was taken with a Nikon 1 AW camera.)

Touch and Go, flying video

As long as we’re on the subject of flying, here’s a video showing a takeoff from Brandywine Airport, a touch and go landing at Easton, MD, and another landing back at Brandywine. Let’s head out to the flight line.

Checklists are one way pilots are sure to cover all the steps for a given portion of the flight. They come in handy for all types of things, too, not just flying. Make one for yourself, perhaps for packing your vacation suitcase. See you at the airport soon.

Flying S37 to KOQN

Today was a short flight in the Cessna 172. Repositioning the plane from the mechanic’s shop at Smoketown Airport (S37) to its base at Brandywine (KOQN). Visibility wasn’t the greatest, about 3 miles, and as the sun came up, I expected it to get better. Well, it didn’t. No worries. All went well as you’ll see here.

Another safe flight in the log book. These short hops keep things interesting, giving the opportunity to practice things like short field takeoffs. It’s always good to stay fresh on the maneuvers. Don’t forget the checklist!

Published in: on November 2, 2011 at 11:56 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Pattern Flying

It looked like it would be another good day to go flying. Weather reports indicated the visibility was fair and getting better. So, I worked up a flight plan, headed to the airport, and rolled out the Cessna 172, looking forward to a day above the ground. As soon as I took off, the conditions were worse than had been reported. Sure, it might have been “good enough” for someone else, but these were below my minimums, mostly because of the mist. When you’re flying, you have to consider the worst case. Sure the visibility at cruising altitude may be legal, but what if you can’t see large portions of the ground due to mist and fog. You lose an engine and down you come, landing in what? You don’t know what. Not good. Hence, upon seeing the conditions didn’t suit the mission, I ended up flying pattern, which is always good practice. Here’s the video:

After a few laps around the patch, practicing short field takeoff and soft field landings, I headed back to the hangar. Sometimes, that’s how it goes. (By the way, those stripes you see on the video are due to an anomaly created by the spinning propeller and the shutter speed of the video camera.)