MD-80’s are retiring

After many years of venerable service, the MD-80’s in the American Airlines fleet are being retired. I had a great flight aboard one recently and had the good fortune to make his short video:

The pilots were great guys, giving me the opportunity to capture footage with my Osmo Pocket camera. Thanks to them and American Airlines.

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Small vehicles, Rome, Italy

Walking around Rome, Italy, I spotted a number of tiny vehicles. In a city of tiny, winding streets, it’s definitely easier to use one of these than a full-size machine. This fleets makes deliveries:

DSC_3099You can see their size relative to the people and car on the right. Then was this passenger vehicle:

DSC_3197Look at it compare to the bicycle on the right. Here’s a colorful variation:

kbdRKjRUSUSm4ovqZw%LNAThe roof is actually lower than the top of the windscreen on the scooters. And as you can see more clearly in the next photo, it’s a pop top.

ALOrWpfBTpSyoQwB2hrQLQI’m sure they get great mileage and are just enough to get you where you want to go and keep the weather off. Be careful.

Published in: on November 28, 2018 at 1:41 pm  Comments (1)  
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F4u Corsair

The F4U Corsair stands as one of the most effective aircraft of its time. Designed by┬áRex Buren Beisel, it fought in various roles in various wars. Here’s one with her wings folded.

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And another view from the front:

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Behind the Corsair stands a P40 Warhawk. Both aircraft are on my bucket list to fly someday. Not sure if that will ever happen, but when I have time (and money) I look for opportunities for just such adventure. By the way, take a look at this wing folding mechanism:

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Sheer genius at work there. For you aviation enthusiasts, enjoy the airshow circuit which will be getting busy soon. Always do your checklist.

Locomotive No. 90

As mentioned in the previous post, I was checking out the steam trains in Strasburg, PA, USA. Here’s a simple iPhone photo of Locomotive No. 90.

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Baldwin Locomotive Works built that beast in 1924. I’m sure there has been some repairs and rebuilds since. Still impressive. Here’s a better shot taken with a Nikon D810 of the running gear:

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Some heavy steel there. As you can see, in magnificent condition thanks to the hard work of the team that keeps these machines on the rails. Check it out someday.