Cathedral, Segovia, Spain

Segovia’s Cathedral stands atop the hill in the old town, fronting a plaza that has an excellent market.

DSC_2872Like many historical structures, the cathedral has been repaired and reconstructed lately, which I was glad to see because the last time I was here I could not get inside.

DSC_2884The towering columns are clean, showing the master stonework. The detail photo below reveals the remnants of paint that once adorned the columns.

DSC_2879There’s plenty of gold leaf around the pipe organ as well:

DSC_2896Note the people in the photo above, which provide scale to the size of this structure. I’ll post again about some of the art in the cathedral. Check back soon!

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Puebla de Sanabria, Spain (2014)

Puebla de Sanabria is one of many towns perched atop a hill in Spain. Every square inch is built upon with winding streets giving access to homes and businesses. Here’s one of the wider streets:

Houses in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Houses in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Eventually, these streets lead to a stately plaza mayor with a government building, castle, and a fine church:

Church in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Church in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Although the facade looks mostly blank, you’ll find some weathered carvings of interest near the door:

Carved statues at church entrance, Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Carved statues at church entrance, Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Many of the homes and posadas in this town are kept to a very high standard as you see in the next image:

Posada in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Posada in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

It’s easy to get lost in these streets so pay attention while ambling about looking for photo opportunities.

Another narrow street in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Another narrow street in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Of course there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy a snack, meal, or drinks, such as this one:

Meson Albadero in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

Meson Abelardo in Puebla de Sanabria, Spain.

There’s a huge lake nearby where people enjoy all kinds of activities, which might be just the thing for you. Check out the small towns in Spain. There much more there than you might think.

Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain

The Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar was built by the Augustinians who took over a former Benedictine monastery. In this first photo, you see the lines of the main structure built in the Romanesque style:

Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Surely in it’s time, it was an imposing building and it still dominates the town today. Going inside the grounds, you’ll find a very pleasant cloister.

View from inside the cloister at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

View from inside the cloister at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

The columns in this cloister are carved with various religious symbols.

Column detail at Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Column detail at Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

And many are covered with vines.

Another view in the cloister of the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Another view in the cloister of the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Going into the church itself you find an impressive altar piece from the 15th century depicting the martyrdom of Saint Juliana.

15th Century altar piece at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

15th Century altar piece at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

As well as this stone tomb for the saint’s remains:

Saint Juliana at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Saint Juliana at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Not to mention a powerful set of pipes for the organ:

Organ pipes at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

Organ pipes at the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar, Spain.

The walk through this church is a step back in time. Within its cool environs you’ll find a sense of dignity and piety that may be lacking at times in larger, busier cathedrals. As always, enter with respect and take your time to absorb the many details that fill this holy place.